A360. Blog

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futurescope:

PSFK Future Of Wearable Tech Report
 
 PSFK Future Of Wearable Tech Report  from PSFK

The Future of Wearable Tech report in collaboration with iQ by intel identifies 10 trends and three major themes that point to the evolving form and function of wearable devices and their influence on the way we live, work and socialize. In our Connected Intimacy theme, we explore how wearables are revolutionizing the way we communicate information about ourselves and maintain relationships over any distance. With the Tailored Ecosystem theme, we look at how these devices are personalizing the world around us and adapting to our ever-changing needs. While the Co-Evolved Possibilities theme considers the potential and promise of a closer union between humans and technology and its impacts on our natural abilities. Within these themes, we take an in-depth look at each of the key trends, bringing them to life with best-in-class examples and connecting the dots with takeaways to help spark thinking and discussion. As you click through the following slides, we hope you find inspiration and innovation that you can leverage and share within your own organization. For more information about the report visit: http://www.psfk.com/publishing/future-of-wearable-tech 

futurescope:

PSFK Future Of Wearable Tech Report

The Future of Wearable Tech report in collaboration with iQ by intel identifies 10 trends and three major themes that point to the evolving form and function of wearable devices and their influence on the way we live, work and socialize. In our Connected Intimacy theme, we explore how wearables are revolutionizing the way we communicate information about ourselves and maintain relationships over any distance. With the Tailored Ecosystem theme, we look at how these devices are personalizing the world around us and adapting to our ever-changing needs. While the Co-Evolved Possibilities theme considers the potential and promise of a closer union between humans and technology and its impacts on our natural abilities. 

Within these themes, we take an in-depth look at each of the key trends, bringing them to life with best-in-class examples and connecting the dots with takeaways to help spark thinking and discussion. As you click through the following slides, we hope you find inspiration and innovation that you can leverage and share within your own organization. 

For more information about the report visit: 
http://www.psfk.com/publishing/future-of-wearable-tech 

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futurescope:

Building an open source Nest
From Slashdot:

"Google’s recent acquisition of Nest, the maker of smart thermostats and smoke detectors, has sparked concerns of future plans for the devices, and how Google’s omnipresent thirst for information will affect them. Thus, a team of engineers at Spark sat down and roughed out a prototype for an open source version of Nest. It looks surprisingly good for such a short development cycle, and they’ve posted their code on Github. The article has a number of short videos illustrating the technology they used, and how they used it. Quoting: ‘All in, we spent about $70 on components to put this together (including $39 for the Spark Core); the wood and acrylic were free. We started working at 10am and finished at 3am, with 3.5 engineers involved (one went to bed early), and the only work we did in advance was order the electronic components. We’re not saying that you can build a $3.2 billion company in a day. But we are saying that you can build a $3.2 billion company, and it’s easier now than it’s ever been before.’”

futurescope:

Building an open source Nest

From Slashdot:

"Google’s recent acquisition of Nest, the maker of smart thermostats and smoke detectors, has sparked concerns of future plans for the devices, and how Google’s omnipresent thirst for information will affect them. Thus, a team of engineers at Spark sat down and roughed out a prototype for an open source version of Nest. It looks surprisingly good for such a short development cycle, and they’ve posted their code on Github. The article has a number of short videos illustrating the technology they used, and how they used it. Quoting: ‘All in, we spent about $70 on components to put this together (including $39 for the Spark Core); the wood and acrylic were free. We started working at 10am and finished at 3am, with 3.5 engineers involved (one went to bed early), and the only work we did in advance was order the electronic components. We’re not saying that you can build a $3.2 billion company in a day. But we are saying that you can build a $3.2 billion company, and it’s easier now than it’s ever been before.’”

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emergentfutures:

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience


The first commercial version of the new kind of computer chip is scheduled to be released in 2014. Not only can it automate tasks that now require painstaking programming — for example, moving a robot’s arm smoothly and efficiently — but it can also sidestep and even tolerate errors, potentially making the term “computer crash” obsolete.

Full Story: NYT

emergentfutures:

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

The first commercial version of the new kind of computer chip is scheduled to be released in 2014. Not only can it automate tasks that now require painstaking programming — for example, moving a robot’s arm smoothly and efficiently — but it can also sidestep and even tolerate errors, potentially making the term “computer crash” obsolete.

Full Story: NYT

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